Worth The Wait

When the flowers blossom the bee will come! This little lady decided that she would much rather have a June birthday #WorthTheWait #HomeBirthJustHappened

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Ask Us about… Skin To Skin with Partners

Did you know that skin-to-skin is beneficial for parents and siblings as well as for your baby?

For the birthing mother skin to skin enhances the release of her oxytocin which in addition to aiding bonding and breastfeeding, helps to contract the uterus after birth, delivering the placenta and reducing maternal blood loss after birth. Because of theses benefits we recommend that birthing mother have at least one hour if uninterrupted skin to skin as soon as possible after birth, ideally with the first feed taking place skin to skin.

If circumstances don’t allow the birthing parent to have skin to skin or once it has taken place we support other care givers and family members ( i.e. The other parent/partner, older siblings) to have skin to skin. Study’s have found higher levels of oxytocin in fathers who had skin to skin with their baby’s shortly after birth compared to those who didn’t.

For your baby skin-to-skin is wonderful way to transition from the uterus in to the world. It had been shown to help your baby regulate their temperature, heart rate and breathing and start to develop their immune system through the colonisation of their skin with friendly bacteria.

Being close to you helps your baby to feel safe, secure and loved. When they feel like this your baby will release the hormone Oxytocin which has a wonderful effect on brain development helping your baby to be happy and grow in to a confident child and later adult.

Ask your midwife about how you can incorporate skin-to-skin in to your birth preferences.

Outstanding

We are absolutely delighted that the Royal Surrey’s Maternity Services have been rated OUTSTANDING in today’s CQC report!

In their report, the CQC’s Deputy Chief Inspector for Hospital Inspection, Amanda Stanford, said:

“Maternity services have also been using innovative methods to improve the experience of patients, including providing integrated person-centred care that involves other providers. One notable example of this is the introduction of midwives in the call centres at the local ambulance trust to ensure women receive the best care and attention when they need it.”

Our staff were described as an energetic and ambitious workforce who took accountability and ownership for changes within the department. It was also noted that staff were responsive to patients’ requests, with adjustments being made where possible to allow patients with specific individual needs to access care.

Examples of outstanding practice noted in the report include our

* Award nominated bobble hat bundle

* Dedicated Home Birth team

* Antenatal education classes

* Pregnancy advice line

* Family Focused Caesarean Births

You can read the full report here http://www.cqc.org.uk/provider/RA2

Ask Us About…Positioning and Attachment

Ask your midwife about how to tell if your baby is positioned and attached well and is getting enough milk.

Good positioning and attachment at the breast is extremely important. Effective attachment ensures that your baby gets enough milk at each feed and that your milk supply is stimulated. It also prevents sore nipples, engorgement, blocked ducts and mastitis.

While you can’t see how much milk your baby is drinking at each feed there are lots of signs that show that your baby is attached well and getting enough milk.

Talk to your midwife in pregnancy about effective breastfeeding or come along to one of our antenatal breastfeeding classes. If you’ve already had your baby talk to your midwife about a breastfeeding assessment.

https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2010/11/otbs_leaflet.pdf

#EveryDropCounts #NoseToNipple #SkinToSkin #Oxytocin #Prolactin #Mastitis #SoreNipples #CHIN