Ask Us About…Hand Expressing

Ask your midwife about hand expressing.

Did you know that being able to hand express is a really useful skill? Hand expressing can be used to help attachment, relieve engorgement and sort out a blocked duct. It is also the best way to express colostrum (the first milk)

However you are planning to feed your baby, they can really benefit from having colostrum as their first feeds.

Colostrum can be hand expressed in pregnancy and stored in small syringes ready for your baby’s arrival.

Ask your midwife about hand expressing or come along to the Colostrum Collection Drop In on a Thursday afternoon (14:00-16:00) the Parentcraft room at the back of antenatal clinic.

#EveryDropCounts #LiquidGold #Colostrum #EBM #KnowYourBoobs

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#AskUs about… Responsive Parenting

Babies have Needs not Wants

It is impossible to spoil a baby. They are not capable of learning a routine or self soothing.

Responding to their cues for comfort and food helps them feel secure, even if they continue to cry while being held.

When a baby’s need for love and attention are met they feel safe, secure and happy. This results in the release of Oxytocin and enhances their brains.

Ask your midwife about responsive parenting and responsive feeding.

https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/happybaby_leaflet-web-2016-2.pdf

Keeping Babies and Young Children Safe in hot Weather

Babies and young children can become ill during very hot weather. Their health can be seriously affected by:

• Dehydration

• Heat exhaustion and heatstroke

• Sunburn

Try these tips for keeping your child happy and healthy in the heat.

Sun safety

Babies less than six months old should be kept out of direct sunlight. Their skin contains too little melanin, which is the pigment that gives skin, hair and eyes their colour and provides some protection from the sun.

All infants & children should be kept out of the sun as much as possible, particularly between 11am and 3pm when the sun is at its strongest. If you go out when it’s hot, attach a parasol or sunshade to your baby’s pushchair to keep them out of direct sunlight. Do not cover the pushchair/car seat with a blanket. The heat under the blanket increases rapidly and you will put your baby at risk of heat stroke!

Apply a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30 to your baby’s skin. Make sure the product also protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Many brands produce sunscreen specifically for babies and young children as these products are less likely to contain additives that might irritate the skin. Apply the suncream regularly, particularly if your child is in and out of the sea or paddling pool.

Make sure your child wears a sunhat with a wide brim or a long flap at the back, to protect their head and neck from the sun.

Avoid dehydration

Like adults, babies and young children need to drink plenty of fluids to avoid becoming dehydrated.

If you’re breastfeeding your baby, you don’t need to give them water as well as breast milk. However, they may want to breastfeed more than usual.

If you’re bottle feeding, as well as their usual milk feeds, you can give your baby cooled boiled water throughout the day. If your baby wakes at night, they’ll probably want milk. If they’ve had their usual milk feeds, try cooled boiled water as well.

• You can be creative when trying to keep your child hydrated. If they’re over six months old and they get bored with water, try giving them a combination of very diluted fruit juice, ice cubes and homemade fruit juice lollies throughout the day. For older children, plenty of fruit and salad will also help keep their fluid levels up.

Keeping cool

Playing in a paddling pool is a good way of keeping babies and children cool. Keep the pool in the shade during very hot weather and supervise the children carefully at all times.

• Run them a cool bath before bedtime.

Keep your child’s bedroom cool during the day by closing blinds or curtains. You can also use a fan to circulate the air in the room.

Keep nightwear and bedclothes to a minimum. If your baby kicks or pushes off the covers during the night, consider putting them in just a nappy with a single well-secured sheet that won’t work loose and cover their face or get entangled during the night.

• A nursery thermometer will help you monitor the temperature of your baby’s room. Your baby will sleep most comfortably when their room is between 16C (61F) and 20C (68F).

Copied from NHS Choices “How can I keep my baby safe in hot weather?” Page 2017

Ask Us About… The First Feed

Did you know that all mothers and babies, regardless of feeding method, benefit from the enhanced oxytocin, closeness and comfort of Skin-to-Skin contact following birth and during their first feed?

Wether you are planning to feed your baby breast milk or formula we recommend that, when ever possible, they experiencing their first feed next to their mothers skin.

Once your baby has had their first feed, after the first hour of life, the baby can share skin to skin cuddles with other close family members.

Did you know that mothers who plan to formula feed can also express and store their colostrum in pregnancy to give to their baby for the first feed?

Ask your midwife about the benefits of skin to skin and colostrum and how to incorporate them in to your birth preferences.

#EveryDropCounts #LiquidGold #Colostrum #Oxytocin #Bonding #BrainDevelopment #BuildingAHappyBaby #SkinToSkin

#AskUs About…Skin to Skin

Skin to skin is a wonderful way to greet your baby and help them transition from the uterus in to the world.

Skin to skin has been shown to help your baby regulate their temperature, heart rate and breathing and start to develop their immune system through the colonisation of their skin with friendly bacteria.

Being close to you helps your baby to feel safe, secure and loved. When they feel like this your baby will release the hormone Oxytocin which has a wonderful effect on brain development helping your baby to be happy and grow in to a confident child and later adult.

Skin to skin also enhances the release of oxytocin in Parents . This helps to contract the uterus after birth, reducing maternal blood loss, is essential for breastfeeding and is the hormone responsible for bonding.

Ask your midwife about how you can incorporate skin-to-skin in to your birth preferences.

https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/happybaby_leaflet-web-2016-2.pdf

#AskUs about…Bump Bonding

Ask your midwife about bump bonding.

You can help your baby’s brain develop in pregnancy by taking time out to relax and bond with them.

Talking, reading and/ or singing to your growing baby, stroking your bump and learning your baby’s movement patterns are wonderful ways to increase yours and your baby’s oxytocin and promote bonding and brain development.

https://www.unicef.org.uk/babyfriendly/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/05/happybaby_leaflet-web-2016-2.pdf

#AskUs #Antenatal #Pregnancy #BrainDevelopment #Oxytocin #BumpBonding #BuildingAHappyBaby

Pregnancy Advice Line

One of the first exciting #BetterBirths developments to come out of the Surrey Heartlands partnership is a brand new dedicated maternity advice line.

Launching on the 9th of April, the advice line will be staffed by experienced midwives who’s responsibility it will be to provide a dedicated service 24/7.

Freeing up other midwives to give clinical care, this phone line will allow maternity clients to access the advice and support they need in a timely way.

This may include answering your pregnancy questions, supporting you at home early labour and arranging transfer to your chosen place of birth and a midwife available 24hrs a day to offer feeding and newborn advice.